Monthly Archives: October 2017

Builder Online, “How to Choose Green Building Materials for a Healthy Home”

By | Sustainability Initiatives | No Comments

Common building or remodeling supplies—like flooring, plumbing, insulation or drywall—can contain toxic chemicals that can present potential health hazards. Homeowners are becoming more aware of what it means to live in a healthy home, and will pay more for a home that doesn’t make them sick. Designers also say that healthy living is driving interior design trends, especially in the kitchen according to recent Houzz surveys.

Chemical pollutants can build up in the indoor air we breathe, released from things like building products, carpet, paint, and other products you wouldn’t expect chemicals to be hiding. That’s why it’s more important than ever for builders to choose products and building materials that are clean and chemical-free, and improve the indoor air quality of the home.

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Forbes, “Apple’s Supply Chain Attracts Criticism For Performance But Also Praise For Sustainability”

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Two recent studies report varying performance levels in Apple’s supply chain. Bloomberg argue that it’s lost its mojo, but Greenpeace rates the tech giant as a sustainability pioneer.

Few corporate supply chains are scrutinized quite like Apple’s. As the technology outsourced more of its production to tiers of Asian suppliers, a new profession has emerged in a supply chain analyst, where as industry analysts of the past previous scoured quarterly earnings, they now delve deep into the opaque world of supply chains.

 

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Popular Mechanics, “A Plastic Warehouse in West Virginia Has Been Burning for a Week”

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Until six days ago, the Intercontinental Export Import warehouse in Parkersburg, West Virginia, was home to a wide variety of plastics including PVC, fiberglass, and Teflon for a wide range of companies. Now the building is home to a giant, raging inferno that shows no signs of stopping.

It’s unclear how the fire started on Saturday morning, but it quickly grew out of control, engulfing the building and resisting all attempts to put it out. Although firefighters have been on the scene since the beginning, the most they can do is keep it from spreading to other buildings and watch mystery chemicals go up in smoke.

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Chicago Tribune, “‘It’s about time this was cleaned up’: Divers remove junk reef off California coast”

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Divers are removing hundreds of old tires, plastic jugs and other junk that was dumped off the Southern California coast nearly 30 years ago by a man who thought he was helping the ocean environment. The cleanup began last week off of Newport Beach, the California Coastal Commission announced Wednesday.

 

Read the full story here.

Recycling Today: “Groups vow to raise $150 million for plastic recycling”

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The nonprofit organization Ocean Conservancy has formed an alliance with partners that include the Trash Free Seas Alliance, Closed Loop Partners, PepsiCo, 3M, Procter & Gamble, the American Chemistry Council and the World Plastics Council to work to raise $150 million for a new funding mechanism to prevent plastic waste from flowing into the ocean.

The initiative is being designed to fund waste management and recycling solutions in Southeast Asia, with a focus on investments to improve collection, sorting and recycling markets, says the group, which met in early October 2017 in Malta at the Our Ocean 2017 conference.

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Grand Rapids Business Journal: “Commission: $271B needed for Great Lakes water systems”

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DULUTH, Minn. — State leaders said the Great Lakes region needs to drastically improve public water systems. The Great Lakes Commission has called for upgrading wastewater treatment plants, stormwater pipes and drinking water filtration systems. The Ann Arbor-based commission, which represents the region’s eight states, said a conservative cost estimate is $271 billion.

 

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